Profile of Invited Expert “deGuzman”

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Profile

Full Name
Margaret M. deGuzman
Position
Associate Professor
Organization
Temple University Beasley School of Law
URL
http://www.law.temple.edu/Pages/Faculty/N_Faculty_deGuzman_Main.aspx
Biography

Margaret deGuzman is an Associate Professor at Temple University’s Beasley School of Law. Her research engages questions about the appropriate role of international criminal law in the global legal order, with a particular focus on the concept of gravity. She has authored a number of publications on such issues as the definition of crimes against humanity and the role of case and situational gravity in the legitimacy of the International Criminal Court. Professor deGuzman is a graduate of Yale Law School, the Fletcher School of Law & Diplomacy, and Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service. She was a Fulbright Scholar in Senegal and is currently a Ph.D. candidate at the Irish Center for Human Rights of the National University of Ireland. Before joining the Temple faculty, Professor deGuzman clerked on the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals and practiced law in San Francisco for six years, specializing in criminal defense. Professor deGuzman also served as a legal advisor to the Senegal delegation at the Rome Conference on the International Criminal Court and as a law clerk in the Office of the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunal for Former Yugoslavia.

Selected Citations to Published Materials
  • How Serious Are International Crimes? The Gravity Problem in International Criminal Law, 51 Colum. J. Transnat’l L. 18 (2012).
  • Choosing to Prosecute: Expressive Selection at the International Criminal Court, 33 Mich. J. Int’l L. 265 (2012).
  • Giving Priority to Sex Crime Prosecutions at International Courts: The Philosophical Foundations of a Feminist Agenda, 11 Int’l Crim. L. Rev. 515 (2011).
  • Gravity and the Legitimacy of the International Criminal Court, 32 Fordham Int’l L.J. 1400 (2009).
  • The Road From Rome: The Developing Law of Crimes Against Humanity, 22 Hum. Rts. Q. 335 (2000).

History

Member for
4 years 7 weeks